Is Tim Keller a “Cultural Marxist”?

Share

Carl Trueman:

If he is not a Marxist, it does not take a postgraduate qualification in logic to deduce that he can scarcely be a cultural Marxist.

Even so, let’s indulge the critics and ask this question:  Does Tim Keller’s view of the culture have parallels with the Gramscian tradition?  Yes, it does in that he is a cultural transformationalist who believes that the world can be dramatically benefited by—schools, universities etc.   So do the Acton Institute, Marvin Olasky and the team at World Magazine and numerous friends and colleagues in First Things circles.   I hardly think they would appreciate being given the label of cultural Marxists.  To want to change the culture is a desire of anyone who is dissatisfied with the status quo, not a necessary sign of commitment to dialectical materialism or a diabolical hatred of free markets.

Let me be clear—while respecting him as a brother in Christ, I am not an acolyte of Rev. Keller.  I disagree at points with both his theology and philosophy of ministry.  Nor do I share his love of the city.  For me, cities are a necessary evil whose sole purpose is to provide country boys like me somewhere to go to the theatre once in a while.  And I am definitely not an optimistic transformationalist as he is—trust me, things are going to get worse before, well, they get even worse than that.

But he is no cultural Marxist, and to call him such is to reveal not the politics of the good doctor but the ignorance of the troll.

It is to indulge in the spirit of this age, which eschews thoughtful argument about difficult issues for moronic and often malicious soundbites.

It is not a helpful way of locating him in current debates in order to further the discussion, but rather a cheap way of pre-emptively delegitimizing him and his opinions.

It is an unwarranted slur on his character, for we all know that cultural Marxism is not intended as a morally neutral term.

And—I almost forgot—it is to break the Ninth Commandment about a Christian brother.  And that’s a sin—not so much a sin against Tim Keller as against the God he serves.

You can read the whole thing here.

(You can also stop clicking on links that commit slander.)

Share
Learn more about the relationship between TGC and the blogs we are honored to host.
LOAD MORE
Loading