Trevin’s Seven

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CSB Webinar: On Tuesday, November 6 at 11:00 a.m. CST, I will be hosting a 30-minute webinar about the CSB and its history, translation philosophy, and why it might be a great translation choice for your church or ministry. Every attendee will receive a complimentary CSB Text Bible (US addresses only, while supplies last). Sign up here if you’d like to join us.

Podcast pick for the week: Justin Brierly’s Unbelievable podcast this week features a debate between Bart Ehrman and Peter Williams on the historical reliability of the Gospels.

Kindle Deal: Faith Alone: The Doctrine of Justification: What the Reformers Taught…and Why It Still Matters by Tom Schreiner. $3.99. 

Seven of the best articles I came across this week:

1. Gavin Ortlund – Why Evangelicals Need Theological RetrievalThere is nothing intrinsic to Protestantism that would encourage us to be isolated from the early and medieval church. On the contrary, the best of Protestant theology has always been historically informed. 

2. Christianity Today – Christian Booksellers’ Defiant New ChapterThis year was the end for the last remaining national chain and the longtime trade association, but the industry is still pushing forward with stubborn faith.

3. Emily Belz – Digital Life After DeathFew people are prepared emotionally or practically for handling social media and other digital accounts after a loved one dies.

4. Aaron Earls – Fewer Than Half of Americans Regularly Attend Church. Due to an almost 10-point drop in the past decade or so, America is no longer a majority church-attending nation.

5. Jackson Watts – Reflections on Ph.D. StudiesGood counsel and considerations here for those who may be thinking about pursuing a terminal degree.

6. Pew Research – National Politics on Twitter: Small Share of U.S. Adults Produce Majority of TweetsMore confirmation that the social media bubble is just that, a bubble, and not indicative of the views of most people.

7. Timothy S. Goeglein & Craig Osten – Restoring Religious Liberty. Why Freedom of Religion Does Not Mean Freedom  From  Religion

 

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