Walking in the Way of Grace with Martin Luther (Part 2)

There’s nothing boring about history. Why, then, do so many of us feel unmoved by the past? Maybe we just don’t know the stories. Maybe we just don’t understand the personalities. Maybe we just can’t feel the drama. Maybe we need to walk in the way of our forebears in the faith.
This summer I visited several sites in Germany connected to the life of Martin Luther, who inaugurated one of the greatest revivals in Christian history 500 years ago this month. I walked where he wandered and stooped where he studied. I marveled at his courage as Luther provoked the political authorities who could take his life and rebuked the religious authorities who could condemn his soul. What except the grace of God could sustain such faith?
Even if you don’t usually enjoy learning about the past—and especially if you don’t know what made Luther such a pivotal figure in Christian history—this podcast is for you. Let “Walking in the Way of Grace with Martin Luther” take you on a journey across centuries and borders as you learn the remarkable story of the monk who defied the powers and defined the modern age.
One sinner saved and sustained by grace can—and did—change the world.
This second episode covers:
  • Luther’s theology
  • The Leipzig Disputiation
  • The Diet of Worms
  • Luther’s confinement in Wartburg Castle and translation of the Scriptures into German
  • The difference the resurrection made
  • Luther’s family life
  • Luther’s death

You can listen to this episode of The Gospel Coalition podcast here. And listen to part one here. Special thanks to Betsy Childs Howard for her creative, expert editing on this and other TGC podcasts. Much of what I taught in this podcast I learned in class or on the bus with Scott Manetsch and Timothy George. I’d also like to thank the Houghton College Choir with organist Judy Congdon, conducted by Daniel David Black, and Houghton’s music industry program for their work in performing and recording Luther’s hymn “Dear Christians, One and All, Rejoice.”

Organ introduction and interlude written by Judy Congdon
Final verse descant written by Daniel David Black
Original harmonization taken from The Lutheran Hymnal, Concordia Publishing House, St. Louis, MO, 1941
English translation by Richard Massie (1854)
Tune: NUN FREUT EUCH, Martin Luther (1524)

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