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5 Strategies for Ministry in a Cretan Context, 5: Do Good Works

In today’s Christianity, commanding people to “do good works” sounds rather weird to most and even dangerous to others. We’re allergic to anything with the word “works” in it. We’re living in an increasingly antinomian age, or at least an increasingly anti-imperative age. We don’t like being told what to do and we’re pretty sure anyone who tries must be “a legalist.”

We wouldn’t know how to handle a letter from the Apostle Paul. We also wouldn’t know how to lead the church in a Cretan context.

For Paul writes:

Remind them to be submissive to rulers and authorities, to be obedient, to be ready for every good work, to speak evil of no one, to avoid quarreling, to be gentle, and to show perfect courtesy toward all people. For we ourselves were once foolish, disobedient, led astray, slaves to various passions and pleasures, passing our days in malice and envy, hated by others and hating one another. But when the goodness and loving kindness of God our Savior appeared, he saved us, not because of works done by us in righteousness, but according to his own mercy, by the washing of regeneration and renewal of the Holy Spirit, whom he poured out on us richly through Jesus Christ our Savior, so that being justified by his grace we might become heirs according to the hope of eternal life.  The saying is trustworthy, and I want you to insist on these things, so that those who have believed in God may be careful …

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5 Strategies for Ministering in a Cretan Context, 2

A little while back we began a brief look at the book of Titus as a window onto biblical strategies for ministering in a context similar to Crete (see here). As Paul describes the situation, “One of the Cretans, a prophet of their own, said, ‘Cretans are always liars, evil beasts, lazy gluttons’” (Titus 1:12). Titus has to plow the hard soil of unregenerate hearts in a culture of dishonesty and fleshly living. How do you labor in such a climate?

First, Paul commands Titus to appoint solid leaders.

Second, those leaders must rebuke people so that they’re sound in the faith. Paul writes:

For there are many who are insubordinate, empty talkers and deceivers, especially those of the circumcision party. They must be silenced, since they are upsetting whole families by teaching for shameful gain what they ought not to teach. One of the Cretans, a prophet of their own, said, “Cretans are always liars, evil beasts, lazy gluttons.” This testimony is true. Therefore, rebuke them sharply, that they may be found in the faith, not devoting themselves to Jewish myths and the commands of people who turn away from the truth. (Titus 1:10-14)

I wonder if we ever hear church plant strategists emphasize the ministry of personal rebuke as an effective strategy? I don’t think I have. But it’s part and parcel to ministry in a difficult context. How else will the corruptions of a fallen culture and fallen heart be addressed?

I suspect most of us are more inclined to finding what …

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Cru Inner City’s Circle of Hope Strategy

One of the ministries I appreciate a great deal is cru inner city. Men like John Sather and others like him around the country are seeking to take the gospel into the core of cities across the country. Here’s a 3-minute video describing their partnership initiative with local churches called “The Circle of Hope.” Check it out:

Our Strategy – The Circle of Hope from Cru Inner City on Vimeo.

Check out the cru inner city/here’s life inner city website to learn more.

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Around the Blog in 80 Seconds

This past week has featured some good reading around the blogosphere. Listed below are some posts I enjoyed:

Sunday (23rd)

Charles M. Blow, “Thomas Speaks… Blindly about Race.” Loved this paragraph:

We must stop having these juvenile discussions of race and face down the big questions: How can we help people see a thing so vaporous? How can we help direct dialogue among individuals about things happening on a grand scale? How can we help avoid victim and guilt fatigue in addressing problems whose formation was glacial and whose undoing is likely to be so as well? And how can we encourage people to fight on two fronts at once: holding the culture responsible for allowing and even nurturing roadblock biases, while still encouraging individuals to make every effort to overcome those biases, identifying and eliminating self-destructive behaviors?

Monday (24th)

The Preaching of William Still

I received a real gift in a comment from Malcolm Duff, who read a post I’d written some time back on William Still’s book, The Work of the Pastor. Still was used of God to impact many better known men in the evangelical world today. He pastored Gilcomstom Church in Scotland for 52 years (1945-1997). He was committed to the exposition of God’s word, but I’d never heard him or knew his sermons were available. Then this gift called Tapes from Scotland which makes available some of Still’s preaching.

Kevin DeYoung shows us how to charitably but critically critique a book in his review of Young, Restless, No Longer Reformed

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Two New Sites Dedicated to Thinking About “Race”

“Race” is a perenniel problem. It seems inescapable and good thinking about “race,” racism, “post-race” and the like can be difficult to find. Even those who think about it professionally have difficulty managing the spiraling issues that “race” spawns. Because of that, we might be tempted to think we need less thinking, writing and discussion of “race,” not more.

But the reality is that unless we apply ourselves to thinking biblically, carefully and hopefully about these things we won’t make progress. We can’t acquire a new mindset or escape the quagmire of “race” and racism by osmosis. We’re going to have to do some hard work.

That’s why I’m glad to highlight two new sites dedicated to the cause.

The first is a site called “The Gospel and Race“. It’s a new joint venture between Soong Chan-Rah and Anthony Bradley.

The second is Eraçe Ourselves. It’s a new blog dedicated to imagining and pursuing a world  where “race” as a construct no longer defines the way we think of ourselves and others. I plan to post there about once a week or so. I’d love it if you would join me there and, more importantly, join me in the project of fostering a biblical view of humanity’s unity and a celebration of God-given diversity rightly understood.

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My Son Shoots David Platt Preaching

So it looks like my son, Titus, has been bitten by the shutter bug, too. He’s been asking for a camera of his own for a while. And every chance he gets, he borrows my camera or his sister’s to take a few snaps. He’s actually pretty good. At least he consistently shoots better shots than I do. Case in point: Here are a string of snaps he took of David Platt preaching at #CROSScon last week.

Two quick reactions:

1. This is not bad for a seven year old; and

2. Captures the subject pretty well.

Also posted in preaching | | 5 Comments

Tweets and Links (Jan. 18, 2014)

A few of the things that encouraged and edified me this past week:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Cross: Day 4 in Pictures

Here are a few snaps from the final powerful day of #CROSScon 2013:

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Cross: Day 3 in Pictures

Here’s a sampling of shots taken on the third day of the conference.

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Cross: Day 2 in Pictures

I’m still rejoicing in the Spirit-filled fellowship and teaching of #CROSScon this past week. Honestly, it perhaps tops my list of conferences where the presence and power of God were most palpably sensed. For some time to come I’ll be sorting through the many profound moments of insight and illumination gained in those four days. But in the meantime, some more pics capturing some moments on day 2 (see day 1 here).

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