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10 Reasons Why the Conventional View of “Spiritual Gifts” May Be Wrong

Posted By Justin Taylor On January 29, 2013 @ 9:58 am In Uncategorized | Comments Disabled

[1]So argues Ken Berding in his book, What Are Spiritual Gifts? Rethinking the Conventional View [2].

The conventional view is that the “spiritual gifts” (Eph. 4:11-12; Rom. 12:6-8; 1 Cor. 12:8-10, 28-30) are God-given special abilities that Christians are to discover and then use in ministry. Berding’s argument is that the spiritual gifts, understood contextually in Paul’s letters, are actually ministry assignments or roles, that is, the actual ministries themselves.

In an interview Dr. Berding gives some reasons for why he holds this view:

1. Many people assume that the Greek word charisma means special ability. This is a misunderstanding of how words work and confuses the discussion.

2. Paul’s central concern in Ephesians 4, Romans 12, and 1 Corinthians 12-14—the “spiritual gifts passages”—is that every believer fulfills his or her role in building up the community of faith. That’s what he’s writing about; that’s what he cares about. The Corinthians, not Paul, were the ones who were interested in special abilities.

3. Paul doesn’t use any ability concepts in his extended metaphor of the body in 1 Corinthians 12:12-27 [3]. His illustration is all about the roles—or the ministries—of the various members of the body.

4. The actual activities that Paul lists in Ephesians 4, Romans 12, and 1 Corinthians 12 can all be described as ministries, but they cannot all be described as abilities.

5. The idea of ministry assignments is a common thread that weaves its way through Paul’s letters. The theme of special abilities is not an important theme in his writings.

6. In approximately 80 percent of Paul’s one hundred or so lists, he places a word or phrase that indicates the nature of the list in the immediate context. There are such indicators in all four of Paul’s lists. This is significant because indicators such as the words appointed, functions, and equipping instruct us that we must read these lists as ministries.

7. When Paul uses the words grace and given together, he’s discussing ministry assignments—either his own or those of others—in the immediate context. This combination appears in two of the three chapters that include ministry lists.

8. Paul talks in detail about his own ministry assignments and suggests that, just as he had received ministry, all believers have also received ministry assignments.

9. The spiritual-abilities view suggests that service should flow out of our strengths; Paul says that sometimes—though not always—we’re called to minister out of weakness. The weakness theme in Paul’s letters does not work with the idea of spiritual gifts as strengths.

10. Neither Paul nor any other New Testament author ever encourages people to try to discover their special abilities; nor is there any example of any New Testament character who embarked on such a quest.

You can read the whole interview here [4].


Article printed from Justin Taylor: http://www.thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/justintaylor

URL to article: http://www.thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/justintaylor/2013/01/29/10-reasons-why-the-conventional-view-of-spiritual-gifts-may-be-wrong/

URLs in this post:

[1] Image: http://thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/justintaylor/files/2013/01/gifts.png

[2] What Are Spiritual Gifts? Rethinking the Conventional View: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0825421241/thegospcoal-20

[3] 1 Corinthians 12:12-27: http://biblia.com/bible/esv/1%20Corinthians%2012.12-27

[4] here: http://someonetellmethestory.com/blog/what-are-spiritual-gifts-an-interview-with-dr-ken-berding/

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