“The cross is so extensive a field for meditation, that, though we traverse it ever so often, we need never resume the same track: and it is such a marvellous fountain of blessedness to the soul, that if we have ever drunk of its refreshing streams, we shall find none other so pleasant to our taste.”

—Charles Simeon, Horae Homileticae (1832), vol. 8, p. 323.

“The cross is the foundation of the Bible: If you have not yet found out that Christ crucified is the foundation of the whole volume, you have hitherto read your Bible to very little profit. Your religion is a heaven without a sun, an arch without a keystone, a compass without a needle, a clock without a spring or weights, a lamp without oil. It will not comfort you; it will not deliver your soul from hell.”

—J.C. Ryle, Old Paths (London, 1977), p. 248.

“There is no end to this glorious message of the cross , for there is always something new and fresh and entrancing and moving and uplifting that one has never seen before.

—D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones, The Cross: God’s Way of Salvation (Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 1986), xiii.

“Oh that I could have the cross painted on my eyeballs, that I could not see anything except through the medium of my Savior’s passion! Oh, Jesus . . . let me wear the pledge forever where it is conspicuous before my soul’s eyes.”

—Charles Haddon Spurgeon, “The Lord’s Supper—Simple But Sublime!” (1866), Sermon #3151, Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit.

All cited in James M. Gordon, Evangelical Spirituality (SPCK, 1991; Wipf & Stock, 2006).

 

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4 thoughts on “The Inexhaustibility of the Cross”

  1. Mike Francis says:

    “Labour, therefore to fill your hearts with the cross of Christ. Consider the sorrows He underwent, the curse He bore, the blood He shed, the cries He put forth, the love that was in all this to your souls, and the mystery of the grace of God therein. Meditate on the vileness, the demerit, and punishment of sin as represented in the cross, the blood, the death of Christ. Is Christ crucified for sin, and shall not our hearts be crucified with Him unto sin? Shall we give entertainment unto that, or hearken unto its dalliances, which wounded, which pierced, which slew our dear Lord Jesus? God forbid! Fill your affections with the cross of Christ, that there may be no room for sin. The world once put Him out of the house into a stable, when He came to save us; let Him now turn the world out of doors, when He is come to sanctify us.” (John Owen, “The Nature and Power of Indwelling Sin,” Chapter 11; 6:250–251

  2. Raymond says:

    With the needed focus on the cross why do evangelical and reformed ministers not make the sign of the cross in worship, prayer or devotional piety?

    1. Raymond,

      I think there is a fine line. We have to be careful not to worship the object itself.

  3. Thanks for these, Justin!

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Justin Taylor


Justin Taylor is senior vice president and publisher for books at Crossway and blogs at Between Two Worlds. You can follow him on Twitter.

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