A look inside the gulags of North Korea. As you watch, remember that many of those being tortured and massacred are brothers and sisters in Christ, members of Christ’s body. “The number of prisoners held in the North Korean gulag is not known: one estimate is 200,000, held in 12 or more centres. Camp 22 is thought to hold 50,000. Most are imprisoned because their relatives are believed to be critical of the regime. Many are Christians, a religion believed by Kim Jong-il to be one of the greatest threats to his power. According to the dictator, not only is a suspected dissident arrested but also three generations of his family are imprisoned, to root out the bad blood and seed of dissent.” (source)

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17 thoughts on “Inside Kim Jong-Il’s Diabolical World”

  1. Jeffrey Brannen says:

    And please send in the Marines

    1. Linda says:

      Yes. We must prayer for intervention. God has granted America, the apple of His eye next to Israel, the special position of being the City on the Hill. It is America that must be a beacon to other countries and provide freedom and the gospel for them.

      Please, Lord, intervene and save. Allow our troops to once again be the liberators of the world. Not for the world’s sake but for Yours.

      Amen.

  2. Chris says:

    Lord if your time is not now to come, than do send in warriors of justice and liberty of all men to free the slaves.

    I’m very disturb by watching these videos, and am full of anger. 1940’s was genocide against the Jews and even some Christians. Today the same thing is going on, but because there are no politics no goes to war for true liberty.

    What a disgrace.

  3. Josh Miller says:

    I read “Under the Loving Care of the Fatherly Leader” by Bradley Martin earlier this year. It was an in-depth, fascinating, and tragic look inside the ‘hermit nation.’ May this open doors for advancement of not only greater humanitarian aid, but greater Gospel access.

    FYI, if you have Netflix, search for ‘Crossing the Line’ a documentary about an American man who defected to N.Korea in the early 60’s. Fascinating, and yes, tragic.

  4. AJ Johns says:

    I’m pretty ignorant of this… Is there anything being done to try to stop this?

  5. Victor says:

    The real story hear is how the media is remembering Kim Jung Il. He was not a tin pot dictator, he was a brutal tyrant in the tradition of Hitler, Stalin, and Pol pot. I am shocked at the way the media is characterizing this evil man, as a “mercurial” dictator as NPR stupidly characterized him.

    Thank you Justin for posting this, people really don’t understand how evil Kim Jung Il was, or how opressive the North Korean regime is.

  6. Dave says:

    yes, thanks for posting this. Praying for an end to this wickedness.

  7. Paul says:

    Yes. Please Pray, but do more. Education yourself, then move to act in ways you can. I firmly believe that the keys to the kingdom have been given to the church, of course not a political or social kingdom, but spiritual. Yet, I ask myself the question, is the church in Korea ready for the opening of North Korea. There is a theological vacuum in the NK “Juche” ideology that the gospel can so fit well into, AND the economic cost of absorbing the poorer state will be bigger than that of East-West Germany. Are Korean Churches, is the global Christian community, willing to make that sacrifice? These few of the ‘opportunities’ where the gospel can be absorbed like a sponge for the lost North Koreans. Please pray for the opening of NK and the readiness of the Church. And if we are not ready, let’s get ready.

    1. Muscles Glistening With Sweat says:

      ” Education yourself, then move to act in ways you can”

      A funny sentence, indeed.

  8. Bob says:

    And we sit with hands folded over our buttons… watching… and doing nothing. Where are God’s people?

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Justin Taylor


Justin Taylor is senior vice president and publisher for books at Crossway and blogs at Between Two Worlds. You can follow him on Twitter.

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