Desiring God’s David Mathis interviews Tim Chester, one of the authors of Total Church, a new book in Crossway/Resurgence’s Re:Lit series that sounds awesome. From the interview:

DG: Tim, what do you and Steve Timmis mean by the title Total Church?

Tim Chester: The phrase is actually adapted from the world of football (or soccer in the States!). “Total football” was a style of play associated with the Dutch international side in the 1970s.

“Total church” is our way of capturing the idea that church is not one activity in our lives. Church isn’t a meeting you attend or a building your enter. It’s our identity, our community, our family. It’s the context for the totality of the Christian life.

DG: How would you summarize the message of the book?

TC: Total Church argues for two core principles: We need to be gospel-centered and community-centered.

Being gospel-centered means we’re word-centered (because the gospel is a message; it is good news), and it means being mission-centered (because the gospel is a message to be proclaimed; it is good news).

I think most conservative evangelicals are strong on this. But we also need to be community-centered. The Christian community is the biblical context for evangelism, discipleship, pastoral care, social involvement, and so on. That doesn’t mean meetings. It means the shared life of the community.

One of our catchphrases is “ordinary people living ordinary life with gospel intentionality.” It means doing the chores, having meals, watching sports, and so on with an intention to talk about Jesus, to pastor one another with the gospel, and to share that gospel with unbelievers.

Great stuff.
Adding this book to my must-get list.

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2 thoughts on “Gospel Intentionality”

  1. Jeff says:

    Jared, the book is even better. It may be a short book, but not really a “quick” read, as there is so much to chew on and be challenged with. Still wading through it. A true gift to the American church by two Brits who are more than theorists, but rather practitioners of the Total Church approach. They get “it.”

  2. Jared says:

    Awesome.I got a copy over the weekend, actually, and I look forward to digging in.Thanks for your comment, Jeff. Your thing about theorists vs. practitioners reminds me of an idea for a post I’ve been meaning to write . . .

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Jared C. Wilson


Jared C. Wilson is the pastor of Middletown Springs Community Church in Middletown Springs, Vermont. You can follow him on Twitter.

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