And Jesus said to him, ‘Foxes have holes, and the birds of the air have nests, but the Son of man has nowhere to lay his head.’ (Mt. 8.20)

I would confidently guess that if you are reading this then you awoke this morning on a pillow in your home. There is of course nothing unusual about this. The majority of people have homes. They are settled and reasonable comfortable. But this is the point: When Jesus walked among people in this word, he had no such comforts. His entire life was uncomfortably committed to his mission of saving comfortable people.

Consider the staggering condescension of Jesus. He goes from the eternal residence of the Trinity to wandering about the villages of Israel without a home. He goes from heaven to homeless! And why? Because he wanted to bring lost people home to God. His homelessness was motivated by love.

The one who made the birds and foxes, giving them the instincts to even find and build a home, was now homeless. His whole life was a continual episode of humility and abandonment.

It is the sharp passages like this from within the satin of the narratives that get me. I can rightly impugn bogus books like Your Best Life Now, but regrettably recline into coziness of thinking my life is about comfort. It is not. Just as Jesus life was calibrated by his work in the gospel so must I be. Jesus was about his mission. I am to be about his mission. As a Christian I have been called, commissioned, and empowered to represent the King. As he went making and training disciples, so must I (Mt. 28.19-21).

See, there is a point here. And it’s not pity. This is something to remember when lifting our heads up from our pillows each morning.

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Erik Raymond


​Erik Raymond is the senior pastor of Emmaus Bible Church in Omaha, Ne. He and his wife Christie have six children. You can follow him on Twitter.

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