1. What it means to love the sinner but hate the sin
There are two errors that are often committed in these areas. The conservative error is to reject both the sinner and the sin in the interests of purity and holiness. The liberal error is to minimize or even celebrate the evil of the sin as good in the interests of acceptance, tolerance, and "love."

Augustine helps us to avoid both errors. If we are at pains to legislate against certain types of behavior but are not undertaking evangelistic efforts to convert those who need it most, we engage in Pharisaic legalism. If we do nothing to rebuke sin, we engage in licentious antinomianism.

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2. 10 Things Nobody Tells You About Being a Dad

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3. From 613 to 1
It has been said somewhere that the whole Law, according to the Jews, was given to Moses in 613 precepts, that David reduced them in the fifteenth Psalm to eleven, that Isaiah further diminished them to six, Micah to three, Isaiah in a later passage to two, but Habakkuk condensed all 613 into one: the just shall live by faith.

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4. The Cost Of Being An Unbeatable Evil Overlord

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5. At Clifton's Cafeteria, someone left a light on. For 77 years.
During renovations of the Broadway eatery, a neon lamp that was switched on during the Great Depression is found behind a partition. The owner estimates it's generated more than $17,000 in electric bills.

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6. The Top Four Forgotten Conflicts in American History

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7. What is catnip, and why do felines love it?

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8. 10 Young Adult Books That Scarred Us For Life

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9. The Plant That Hunts Its Prey
Think that plants are just sitting around photosynthesizin', think again: some plants like the parasitic dodder vine actually hunt.

Consuelo De Moraes of Penn State University discovered that the parasitic plant can even sniff out its prey

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10. Top 10 Fascinating Facts About Castles

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11. The Monarchy: More Ancient than Modern
Commentators repeat with regularity the claim that the Queen's greatest achievement, besides simple longevity, is her modernisation of the monarchy. But, says Dan Jones, she still owes a great deal to her medieval predecessors.

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12. Animal Video of the Week: Cantaloupe the Kleptomaniac



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13. What Speed Do You Read?

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14. Is Kansas as flat as a pancake?
While driving across the American Midwest, it is common to hear travelers remark, "This state is as flat as a pancake." To the authors, this adage seems to qualitatively capture some characteristic of a topographic geodetic survey 2. This obvious question "how flat is a pancake" spurned our analytical interest, and we set out to find the 'flatness' of both a pancake and one particular state: Kansas.

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15. New Yorkers drink seven times as much coffee as the rest of us
New Yorkers really love their coffee: They drink 6.7 times as much as do people who live in other major cities. Philadelphians, however, look to be especially partial to pretzels, eating about five times as many as those who live elsewhere, according to the number crunchers at health-care start-up Massive Health.

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16. The Top Ten Botched Escapes from Gilligan's Island

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17. Socrates acquitted in ancient trial re-run
Judges narrowly acquitted Socrates, the philosopher whose teachings earned him a death sentence in ancient Athens, in a retrial Friday billed as a lesson for modern times of revolution and crisis.

Socrates spoke himself at his trial in the fourth century BC, but this time in his absence, a panel of 10 US and European judges heard pleas by top Greek and foreign lawyers at the event at the Onassis Foundation in Athens.

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18. 10 Highbrow Books to Read on the Beach

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19. Do You Really Want to Live Forever?
Cave identifies four immortality narratives that drive civilizations over time which he calls; (1) Staying Alive, (2) Resurrection, (3) Soul, and (4) Legacy. Cave gracefully marches through his four immortality narratives citing examples from history, psychology, and religion up to the modern day. "At its core, a civilization is a collection of life extension technologies: agriculture to ensure food in steady supply, clothing to stave off cold, architecture to provide shelter and safety, better weapons for hunting and defense, and medicine to combat injury and disease," he writes.

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20. Learn Proper Breathing Techniques for Different Exercises to Last Longer with Less Effort

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21. MIT Scientists Develop a Device for Needle-less Injections
MIT scientists are developing a needle-less injection that could make getting a flu shot as painless as a mosquito bite.

The device shoots a tiny, high-pressure jet of medicine through the skin as fast as the speed of sound.

According to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, hospital healthcare workers incur about 385,000 needle-related injuries every year. Meanwhile, fear or discomfort from needles prevents many patients from complying with doctors' orders.

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22. How the 'Hatfields and McCoys' Feud Ruined the Image of Rural America

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23. Analog Father Writes To Digital Son
Your friends will become your surrogate family once the cruel, Darwinian abandonment of your parents and siblings is complete. And by friends, I refer to those rare few people who will bring you soup when you are sick, correct your tendency toward self-aggrandizement and do whatever onerous favors that are the Digital Age equivalent of driving you to the airport. A Facebook friend will not drag you to the health clinic when you develop a mysterious and fast-spreading rash.

(Via: Take Your Vitamin Z)

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24. Infographic of the Week: The Average Person Gets 9,672 Minor Injuries in a Lifetime

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25. It's Not Just You: 'Old Person Smell' Is Real
In a study published today in PLoS One, researchers report that young people aged 20-30 are able to accurately guess when a scent comes from an elderly individual aged 75-95. While study participants were also able to determine when a smell was associated with someone in middle age or in their youth, they were much better at smelling old people than young people

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26. Cracking Your Knuckles Can Give You Arthritis: Science or Myth?

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27. How the Golden Gate Bridge Was Built


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28. How-To of the Week: Turn an Old Cellphone Into a Super Cheap Home Automation System

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29. Anachronisms that aren't actually anachronistic
"Fly" mentioned above is one of my favorites (though it's considered dated by youngsters today -- they'll basically only use it ironically), but one not mentioned so is "crib" (also a bit dated) which has meant something like "house" or "home" since 1600. OED: "A small habitation, cabin, hovel; a narrow room; fig. a confined space. In N.Z. now esp. a small house at the seaside or at a holiday resort."

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30. How Headphones Changed the World

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31. Should We Be More Skeptical of Brain Scan Research?
Imagine you are playing two roulette wheels. Clearly, the result of one doesn't affect the outcome of the other but sometimes they'll both come up with the same number just due to chance. Now imagine you have a roulette wheel for every point or voxel in the brain. A comparison of any two scans could look like some areas show linked activity when really there is no relationship. Ideally, the analysis should separate roulette wheels from genuine activity, but you may be surprised that hundreds if not thousands of studies have been conducted without such corrections.

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32. 10 Fictional Characters People Need to Stop Idolizing

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33. Measuring the Universe: How Astronomers Learned to Measure Celestial Distances

Joe Carter is an editor for The Gospel Coalition and the co-author of How to Argue Like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History’s Greatest Communicator. You can follow him on Twitter.

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Joe Carter


Joe Carter is an editor for The Gospel Coalition and the co-author of How to Argue Like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History’s Greatest Communicator. You can follow him on Twitter.

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