Should preachers aim for the affections? Is this even possible without resorting to manipulation techniques? In a new roundtable video, John Piper, Voddie Baucham, and Miguel Núñez—all Council members for The Gospel Coalition—explore differences between "working the crowd" and awakening authentic, God-honoring emotion.

"As long as preaching unpacks the greatness of God, the emotions should be moved," Núñez observes. Faithful exposition, then, is a excellent way to cultivate godly affection and safeguard against squalid manipulation.

A bored preacher misrepresents the God he proclaims, Piper adds, since God is not boring. Moreover, he explains, "the difference between emotion and emotionalism is whether you've awakened it with truth."

Baucham references a complaint sometimes voiced in more traditionally emotional (e.g., black and Latino) cultures that emphasizing truth and theology amounts to "denying your culture, your heritage, your ethnicity." But the call to awaken affections with biblical truth is not culturally specific. As Piper quips, "I want to be known as the best black preacher there ever was."

Watch the full 12-minute video to hear these three preachers discuss Grand Canyon moments, when God looks boring, and more.

Preaching to the Affections from The Gospel Coalition on Vimeo.

Matt Smethurst serves as associate editor for The Gospel Coalition. He and his wife, Maghan, have two children and live in Louisville, Kentucky, where they belong to Third Avenue Baptist Church. You can follow him on Twitter.

  • Print Friendly and PDF

tags:


If you liked this, then you may like:


view comments

Comments:


Matt Smethurst


Matt Smethurst serves as associate editor for The Gospel Coalition. He and his wife, Maghan, have two children and live in Louisville, Kentucky, where they belong to Third Avenue Baptist Church. You can follow him on Twitter.

sponsors