Years ago, I wrote a newsletter called Every Husband Feels Like a Jerk and Every Wife Agrees. It was meant to explain a common phenomenon that kept emerging in the course of my marriage counseling practice. No matter what else they brought to the table, couples seemed to agree on one thing: No one believed the husbands demonstrated loyal love in their marriages.

In fact, whenever I began to talk about the quality of love in the marital relationship, most husbands began to act ashamed. They were like Isaiah when he saw the Lord sitting on his throne, "high and lifted up" (Isa. 6:1). It seemed like their wives were so good at love.

It's true. In almost every case, a wife approaches marriage with a deeper understanding of and passion for loyal love. I consider this a God-given gift, one way she reflects the image of God (Gen. 1:27). I began to identify this as an aspect of a wife's inner beauty.

This inner beauty exposes areas where a husband is lacking. Just as Isaiah encountered the Lord's beauty, I heard husbands echo his response: "My destruction is sealed, for I am a sinful man and a member of sinful race" (Isa. 6:5).

But unlike Isaiah, who was reduced to humble contrition in the presence of such loveliness, husbands tend to fight back. "My wife wants too much from me," they declare. The wives counter with a long list of their husbands' failures. This tension increases because neither the husband nor the wife responds well to her gift of inner beauty.

Couple Implications

If inner beauty is God's gift to a woman, then it stands to reason that it's a gift that can be employed in the service of building redemptive marriages. I want to suggest a couple of implications for each couple.

To grow in loyal love, a husband must not be afraid for his sin to be exposed in his wife's presence. This requires humility. He must stop telling his wife she wants too much and instead look to the Lord for his help. Typically, a husband wants to be a knight in shining armor. Instead, he needs to be willing to humbly see the ways he hides and casts blame. As a husband opens up to this exposure and learns to look to the Lord for forgiveness and care, he has more to give his wife. A wife's inner beauty matters because a husband can let it expose his deep need for God's grace and mercy. A wife's inner beauty is meant to turn a husband toward the Lord, not drive him to intimidation, control, or defensiveness.

To use her gift to enhance loyal love, a wife must remember that her husband experiences shame in her presence. He experiences this whether or not she says or does anything. Her gift of inner beauty can be that powerful. When a wife trusts this, she can relate to her husband with more kindness and rest instead of feeling compelled to help her husband recognize where he is lacking. When Peter encourages wives to let their "adorning be the hidden person of the heart with the imperishable beauty of a gentle and quiet spirit," (1 Peter 3:4), he is telling wives to rest as their husbands learn how to make room for the ongoing conviction of sin that comes with marriage. Peter wanted women to stop expending so much effort. A husband's struggle to love well should turn a wife toward more faith and less activity as she waits for him to grow into God's love.

In fact, as a wife rests and shows kindness in the midst of her husband's frustration, she can have a powerful effect. After Isaiah witnesses God's beauty and expresses humility, a seraph touches his lips with a coal and says, "Behold, this has touched your lips; your guilt is taken away, and your sin atoned for" (Isa. 6:7). Later, we find Isaiah willingly responding to the Lord's direction. Beauty and kindness together inspired courage in Isaiah. He is moved to stand up and follow the Lord.

It works the same way in marriage. When a husband responds well to his wife's inner beauty, and when a wife mixes it with kindness, she becomes a compelling force in her husband's life.

Gordon C. Bals founded Daymark Pastoral Counseling in Birmingham, Alabama, a ministry committed to restoring people to God and to one another. Anyone interested in reading further about this topic and/or related marital themes can find them in his recently published book, Common Ground: God’s Gift of a Restored Marriage, available on Amazon or on his website, www.daymarkcounseling.com.

  • Print Friendly and PDF

tags:


If you liked this, then you may like:


view comments

Comments:


Gordon C. Bals


Gordon C. Bals founded Daymark Pastoral Counseling in Birmingham, Alabama, a ministry committed to restoring people to God and to one another. Anyone interested in reading further about this topic and/or related marital themes can find them in his recently published book, Common Ground: God’s Gift of a Restored Marriage, available on Amazon or on his website, www.daymarkcounseling.com.

sponsors